Science policy news: weekly roundup: October 9, 2015 ?>

Science policy news: weekly roundup: October 9, 2015

The roundup is formatted with the title of the story, followed by the news source in parentheses and a brief summary. If you find a particularly interesting article, please send it to smartin@asbmb.org for inclusion in next week’s roundup.

Scientists convened this week in Washington, D.C. to discuss ethical concerns regarding CRISP-Cas9 genome editing.

Science Would Like Some Rules for Genome Editing, Please (WIRED)

The Battle Over Genome Editing Gets Science All Wrong (WIRED)

Gene editing: Research spurs debate over promise vs. ethics (Phys.org)

 

Diversity lags in science, technology, engineering and mathematics careers.

National Institutes of Health addresses the science of diversity (PNAS)

Biomedical startups lack women (Minnesota Daily)

 

A recent study confirmed biomedical research advances are slow and built on a broad base of scientific knowledge. All scientists everywhere nod heads in agreement.

Finding cures for diseases can take up to a century (Health 24)

Change the Course of Biomedical History (Washington Monthly)

 

Lorenz Studer, who received a MacArthur Foundation genius grant, hopes to treat Parkinson’s patients with stem cell neuron transplants.

Ask a MacArthur genius: Can transplanted brain cells cure Parkinson’s? (The Washington Post)

 

The National Institutes of Health to dedicate $10M from the Common Fund for research to analyze, synthesize and characterize glycans.

NIH Dedicates Funds to Carbohydrate Science (BioPharm International)

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