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Author: Daniel Pham

Meet the new ASBMB ATP delegates ?>

Meet the new ASBMB ATP delegates

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is proud to introduce the delegates in the second cohort of the society’s Advocacy Training Program. These 12 ASBMB members are at various stages of their careers and hail from all regions of the U.S. They were chosen for their dedication to advocating for the science community, their desire to learn more about effective means of advocacy and their experience as leaders in their labs and community. The delegates are: Zarina Akbary,…

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Tell lawmakers to support science by ending the government shutdown ?>

Tell lawmakers to support science by ending the government shutdown

Tell lawmakers to support science by ending the government shutdown Click here to urge your representatives to reopen the federal government and support the vital work done by federal science agencies such as the National Science Foundation. Send an email, letter or tweet through our portal to make your voice heard.    As the shutdown continues, science is getting hurt As the U.S. government enters its 28th day of a partial shutdown, the closure of federal science agencies, including the…

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Science policy weekly roundup: January 11, 2019 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: January 11, 2019

Science policy weekly roundup: January 11, 2019   The partial U.S. government shutdown affects the National Science Foundation The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s public affairs director, Benjamin Corb, details how the partial government shutdown, now entering its 21st day, is affecting the National Science Foundation and scientists funded by the agency.  No grants have been allocated in 2019 due to the shutdown. By this time in 2018, $103.3 million had been allocated. Read more here.   The…

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Science policy weekly roundup: January 4, 2019 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: January 4, 2019

NIH advisory committee meets to discuss issues affecting science community The National Institutes of Health’s Advisory Committee to the Director met on Dec. 13 to provide updates on the agency’s policies that address sexual harassment in science, discuss recommendations to support the Next Generation of Researchers Initiative, and examine efforts to address foreign influence on the U.S. research enterprise. Read more here.   Droegemeier approved to direct White House OSTP Kelvin Droegemeier, nominee for the director of the White House…

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ASBMB convenes panel to discuss how Congress can address sexual harassment in science ?>

ASBMB convenes panel to discuss how Congress can address sexual harassment in science

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology hosted a congressional briefing Dec. 6 to discuss the U.S. Congress’s role in addressing sexual harassment and misconduct in science. University of Illinois professor Kathryn Clancy, Nobel laureate Carol Greider and Andrew Black of the American Association for the Advancement of Science discussed policies and legislation in front of an audience of congressional staffers and representatives of scientific societies. Clancy, a member of the National Academies of Science’s committee on sexual harassment…

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Science policy weekly roundup: December 14, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: December 14, 2018

Partial government shutdown likely as negotiations falter During a testy exchange with Democratic congressional leaders this week, President Donald Trump threatened a government shutdown if a spending bill to fund parts of the government did not include at least $5 billion for a U.S.–Mexico border wall. Lawmakers, many of whom have already left Washington, D.C., for winter recess, have until Dec. 21 to pass a funding bill to keep the government open.  Read more here.   U.S. Congress holds hearing on…

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Science policy weekly roundup: December 7, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: December 7, 2018

Congress passes stopgap funding to prevent partial government shutdown The U.S. Congress passed a two-week stopgap funding bill on Thursday to prevent a partial government shutdown. The deadline to pass seven funding bills to fund several federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation, is today. Negotiations have faltered due to disagreements on funding the U.S.–Mexico border wall. Read more here.   HHS denies that it canceled research project involving human fetal tissue The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services…

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Science policy weekly roundup: November 30, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: November 30, 2018

Critics pounce on scientist’s claim of using CRISPR on human embryos A firestorm of criticism ensued after Chinese scientist He Jiankui’s claim that he used CRISPR to genetically alter the DNA of human embryos that were used to produce twin girls. Chinese authorities have suspended Jiankui’s research, while National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins called for a “binding international consensus” on regulating gene editing. Read more here.   Trump prioritizes border wall funding in latest budget negotiations President Donald…

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Science policy weekly roundup: November 16, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: November 16, 2018

Science policy weekly roundup: November 16, 2018 Department of Education proposes additional protections for students accused of sexual assault U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos today announced new changes to Title IX laws, which prevent gender discrimination at schools that receive federal dollars. The changes include allowing schools to raise the amount of proof needed to substantiate a sexual assault allegation and giving the accused and accuser the right to cross-examine each other. “The rules do not go into effect until…

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Science policy weekly roundup: November 9, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: November 9, 2018

How did scientists perform in the 2018 midterm elections? At least seven scientists running their first campaigns for the U.S. House of Representatives won their races.  Several flipped their districts from Republican to Democrat, including entrepreneur Sean Casten, who has a background in biochemistry. Read more here.   Dem takeover of U.S. House may lead to legislative gridlock The Democrats’ takeover of the House of Representatives likely will stall President Donald Trump’s legislative agenda. Also, it’s unclear how federal budget negotiations…

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