Browsed by
Category: Continuing Resolution

The shutdown, a startup, stories and stamps ?>

The shutdown, a startup, stories and stamps

By Daniel Wilson | Carnegie Mellon University   Most students graduating with Ph.D.s in the life sciences and planning to work in industry probably don’t pay a whole lot of attention to how U.S. lawmakers’ budget negotiations are going. But many found out the hard way during the recent government shutdown that, indeed, their work and livelihoods can be put in jeopardy when Congress and the president are at an impasse. Amber Lucas was one of the young scientists affected….

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: December 14, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: December 14, 2018

Partial government shutdown likely as negotiations falter During a testy exchange with Democratic congressional leaders this week, President Donald Trump threatened a government shutdown if a spending bill to fund parts of the government did not include at least $5 billion for a U.S.–Mexico border wall. Lawmakers, many of whom have already left Washington, D.C., for winter recess, have until Dec. 21 to pass a funding bill to keep the government open.  Read more here.   U.S. Congress holds hearing on…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: December 7, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: December 7, 2018

Congress passes stopgap funding to prevent partial government shutdown The U.S. Congress passed a two-week stopgap funding bill on Thursday to prevent a partial government shutdown. The deadline to pass seven funding bills to fund several federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation, is today. Negotiations have faltered due to disagreements on funding the U.S.–Mexico border wall. Read more here.   HHS denies that it canceled research project involving human fetal tissue The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: November 30, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: November 30, 2018

Critics pounce on scientist’s claim of using CRISPR on human embryos A firestorm of criticism ensued after Chinese scientist He Jiankui’s claim that he used CRISPR to genetically alter the DNA of human embryos that were used to produce twin girls. Chinese authorities have suspended Jiankui’s research, while National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins called for a “binding international consensus” on regulating gene editing. Read more here.   Trump prioritizes border wall funding in latest budget negotiations President Donald…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: September 28, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: September 28, 2018

Where we’ve been: Attending the NSF BIO advisory meeting Science Policy Analyst André Porter provides an update from last week’s National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Biological Sciences Advisory Committee meeting. NSF officials discussed several issues affecting the directorate, including the elimination of submission deadlines, efforts to support mid-career researchers, and recently released sexual harassment policies.  Read more here.   U.S. House passes funding bill to give NIH $2 billion boost The U.S. House voted Wednesday to pass a spending package…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: August 3, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: August 3, 2018

ASBMB supports Trump’s nominee to lead White House science advisory group The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology applauds the nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The OSTP has lacked a director for 19 months. President Donald Trump’s nominee is a respected meteorologist with extensive leadership experience at science organizations including the National Science Foundation. Read more here.   Trump mulls shutdown as Congress looks to fund government Congressional leaders…

Read More Read More

Episode 10 of “Pipettes and Politics” is available. ?>

Episode 10 of “Pipettes and Politics” is available.

Episode 10 of the ASBMB science policy podcast “Pipettes and Politics” is now available. ASBMB public affairs staff members provide updates on the U.S. House and Senate fiscal year 2019 budget proposals for the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy Office of Science. Staff members also talk about the discussions at the NIH Advisory Council meetings regarding its draft recommendations to address the next generation of researchers and the NIH’s response to reducing…

Read More Read More

FY18 omnibus proposes $1.3 trillion in spending with increases to the NSF, NIH and DOE’s Office of Science ?>

FY18 omnibus proposes $1.3 trillion in spending with increases to the NSF, NIH and DOE’s Office of Science

Update: The U.S. Senate passed the omnibus bill to fund the government until Sept. 30 Today, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a $1.3 trillion spending bill to fund the government for the remainder of the 2018 fiscal year.  Included in the bill are substantial increases to the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy’s office of science. The bipartisan spending bill largely rejects the Trump administration’s proposed cuts for FY18 that totaled $57.3 billion….

Read More Read More

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: March 16, 2018 ?>

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: March 16, 2018

Share the importance of your research in an op-ed Join the ASBMB in advocating for the importance of research funding from March 19 to April 11 by writing an op-ed for your local paper. Op-eds help your legislators understand the importance of research and how it affects their constituents. Watch our webinar on how to write an op-ed, and then sign up here to make your voice heard. Lawmakers disagree on details of budget as government shutdown looms, again Congressional…

Read More Read More

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: February 16, 2018 ?>

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: February 16, 2018

ASBMB responds to President Donald Trump’s FY19 budget The Trump administration’s FY19 budget originally called for deep cuts for the NIH and the NSF. However, in response to the congressional budget deal that will infuse billions of dollars to the federal budget, the Office of Management and Budget walked back the cuts and instead proposed flat funding levels for those agencies. The administration’s original intent to reduce the NIH and NSF budgets demonstrate that the research enterprise is not a…

Read More Read More