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Category: International Collaboration

Science policy weekly roundup: August 31, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: August 31, 2018

Senate committee holds hearing on nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier to head OSTP Science Policy Analyst André Porter discusses last week’s U.S. Senate committee hearing to nominate Kelvin Droegemeier to lead the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Several senators asked the nominee about how he would ensure that scientific evidence would be taken seriously by the administration. Droegemeier, a meteorologist, also side-stepped questions regarding whether humans were responsible for climate change. Read more here.   Elizabeth Warren raises concern about…

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Science policy weekly roundup: August 24, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: August 24, 2018

  What do you think about NIH efforts to support next generation of researchers? The National Institutes of Health is proposing recommendations to support the next generation of researchers, and we at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology want to know what you think. We will collect your feedback and send it to the NIH. Submit your opinion and view a timeline of the ASBMB’s involvement here. U.S. Senate passes NIH appropriations bill In an 85-7 vote on…

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ASBMB statement on Trump’s decision to end DACA ?>

ASBMB statement on Trump’s decision to end DACA

  In response to President Donald J. Trump’s decision to end DACA, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology released the following statement: The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which represents more than 10,000 scientists throughout the world, strongly condemns the actions taken by President Donald Trump to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, and supports congressional action to codify this important policy into law. The life science research enterprise is built upon…

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Anti-globalization rhetoric threatens scientific and technological progress ?>

Anti-globalization rhetoric threatens scientific and technological progress

The U.S. depends on international collaborations and immigrants to solve domestic and global problems   Opponents of globalization point to low-wage immigrant workers, trade imbalances and cultural differences as reasons for redefining the United States’ international relationships and tightening its immigration laws. What rarely figures into the conversation is the fact that international collaborations and foreign-born talent are essential if the U.S. wants to continue to lead the world in terms of scientific output and continue to produce life-saving medications…

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