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Category: Minorities in Science

Science policy weekly roundup: November 9, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: November 9, 2018

How did scientists perform in the 2018 midterm elections? At least seven scientists running their first campaigns for the U.S. House of Representatives won their races.  Several flipped their districts from Republican to Democrat, including entrepreneur Sean Casten, who has a background in biochemistry. Read more here.   Dem takeover of U.S. House may lead to legislative gridlock The Democrats’ takeover of the House of Representatives likely will stall President Donald Trump’s legislative agenda. Also, it’s unclear how federal budget negotiations…

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Science policy weekly roundup: Nov. 2, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: Nov. 2, 2018

 Register for webinar: Securing private funding for research This webinar, hosted by the ASBMB Public Affairs Department, will explore how you can obtain funding for basic research from private foundations. Topics include how to initiate and develop contacts with private foundations, how the application process differs from federal agencies, and the opportunities, limitations and challenges of securing private funding. The one-hour webinar will be Wednesday, Nov. 15, at noon EST. Register today.   Advocate spotlight: Meet T.L. Jordan, an advocate…

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Science policy weekly roundup: October 12, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: October 12, 2018

Proposed bill to study sexual harassment in science Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-Texas, introduced a bill Oct. 5 to study factors that contribute to sexual harassment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields, and how harassment affects the scientific community. The proposed bill would give the National Science Foundation funding to support studies that develop and assess policies and interventions, and would create an interagency working group to coordinate these efforts. Read more here.   Columbia University postdocs vote to…

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Science policy weekly roundup: August 31, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: August 31, 2018

Senate committee holds hearing on nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier to head OSTP Science Policy Analyst André Porter discusses last week’s U.S. Senate committee hearing to nominate Kelvin Droegemeier to lead the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Several senators asked the nominee about how he would ensure that scientific evidence would be taken seriously by the administration. Droegemeier, a meteorologist, also side-stepped questions regarding whether humans were responsible for climate change. Read more here.   Elizabeth Warren raises concern about…

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Science Policy Weekly Roundup: March 16, 2018 ?>

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: March 16, 2018

Share the importance of your research in an op-ed Join the ASBMB in advocating for the importance of research funding from March 19 to April 11 by writing an op-ed for your local paper. Op-eds help your legislators understand the importance of research and how it affects their constituents. Watch our webinar on how to write an op-ed, and then sign up here to make your voice heard. Lawmakers disagree on details of budget as government shutdown looms, again Congressional…

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Science policy weekly roundup: December 22, 2017 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: December 22, 2017

The National Institutes of Health Advisory Committee to the Director discusses strategies to support the next generation of researchers Science Policy Analyst André Porter summarizes discussions about how to best support the next generation of researchers at the meeting of the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director. While the NIH has remained committed to supporting young researchers, effective strategies have remained elusive. A possible third iteration of new policies may be introduced in 2018, as the NIH struggles to satisfy…

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ASBMB provides feedback on latest NIGMS proposal to increase diversity ?>

ASBMB provides feedback on latest NIGMS proposal to increase diversity

  In August, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences requested feedback from the scientific community on the potential impacts of changing the funding vehicle for some of the institute’s undergraduate and predoctoral diversity programs.  The institute is seeking to support a broader swath of students by moving its undergrad diversity programs, which use the research education code (R25), to training grants (T32 or T34).  Training grants allow grantees to extend tuition support to undergraduate students, which is not possible…

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Science policy weekly news update: October 27, 2017 ?>

Science policy weekly news update: October 27, 2017

  Standardizing postdoc titles Eight scientists and science policy experts with ties to the ASBMB published an opinion article in the journal eLife this week making the case that what we call postdoctoral researchers really does matter. Read the ASBMB announcement and the eLife article.   What is next for the March for Science? It has been six months since the March for Science, a global event uniting hundreds of thousands of scientists from around the world to highlight the…

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ASBMB statement on Trump’s decision to end DACA ?>

ASBMB statement on Trump’s decision to end DACA

  In response to President Donald J. Trump’s decision to end DACA, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology released the following statement: The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which represents more than 10,000 scientists throughout the world, strongly condemns the actions taken by President Donald Trump to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, and supports congressional action to codify this important policy into law. The life science research enterprise is built upon…

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Statement from the ASBMB on its commitment to diversity and inclusion upon the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States ?>

Statement from the ASBMB on its commitment to diversity and inclusion upon the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is committed to ensuring a diverse, inclusive and supportive environment in which scientists can make the important breakthroughs that will improve the health and quality of life of people across the world. During the 2016 presidential election, we heard harsh rhetoric  that caused great concern among those in our diverse community. Since the election of Donald Trump as president-elect, we have seen violence and other hate-inspired acts that make members of our…

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