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Science policy weekly roundup: November 9, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: November 9, 2018

How did scientists perform in the 2018 midterm elections? At least seven scientists running their first campaigns for the U.S. House of Representatives won their races.  Several flipped their districts from Republican to Democrat, including entrepreneur Sean Casten, who has a background in biochemistry. Read more here.   Dem takeover of U.S. House may lead to legislative gridlock The Democrats’ takeover of the House of Representatives likely will stall President Donald Trump’s legislative agenda. Also, it’s unclear how federal budget negotiations…

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Science policy weekly roundup: Nov. 2, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: Nov. 2, 2018

 Register for webinar: Securing private funding for research This webinar, hosted by the ASBMB Public Affairs Department, will explore how you can obtain funding for basic research from private foundations. Topics include how to initiate and develop contacts with private foundations, how the application process differs from federal agencies, and the opportunities, limitations and challenges of securing private funding. The one-hour webinar will be Wednesday, Nov. 15, at noon EST. Register today.   Advocate spotlight: Meet T.L. Jordan, an advocate…

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Science Policy Weekly Roundup: October 26, 2018 ?>

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: October 26, 2018

Candidates with science backgrounds face challenges in their congressional races Fewer than 20 candidates with STEM backgrounds are still in the race for congressional seats. After a bruising primary that kicked out a majority of the STEM candidates, those who remain still face several hurdles as the midterms draw closer, including well-funded opponents with large networks. Read more here.    Scientists warn of Brexit’s possible damaging effects on science Amid talks of limiting immigration in Britain’s negotiations to exit the European Union, dozens of prominent scientists urged…

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Science policy weekly roundup: Oct. 19, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: Oct. 19, 2018

Scientists navigate life after congressional run Dozens of scientists ran for congressional seats this year, but a majority failed to win their primary races. While many lost because of their inexperience and lack of connections to local political institutions, some are continuing to explore their new passion for public service as they settle back into the lab.  Read more here.    Scientists push to stop cardiac stem-cell study based on fabricated data Scientists are urging a national clinical trial network stop…

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Science policy weekly roundup: October 12, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: October 12, 2018

Proposed bill to study sexual harassment in science Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-Texas, introduced a bill Oct. 5 to study factors that contribute to sexual harassment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields, and how harassment affects the scientific community. The proposed bill would give the National Science Foundation funding to support studies that develop and assess policies and interventions, and would create an interagency working group to coordinate these efforts. Read more here.   Columbia University postdocs vote to…

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Science policy weekly roundup: September 28, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: September 28, 2018

Where we’ve been: Attending the NSF BIO advisory meeting Science Policy Analyst André Porter provides an update from last week’s National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Biological Sciences Advisory Committee meeting. NSF officials discussed several issues affecting the directorate, including the elimination of submission deadlines, efforts to support mid-career researchers, and recently released sexual harassment policies.  Read more here.   U.S. House passes funding bill to give NIH $2 billion boost The U.S. House voted Wednesday to pass a spending package…

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Science policy weekly roundup: September 21, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: September 21, 2018

The ASBMB PAAC responds to NIH statement addressing sexual harassment in science The ASBMB PAAC released a statement in response to the NIH’s latest statement regarding sexual harassment in science. The PAAC urged the NIH to define how the agency will respond to violations of sexual harassment policies at NIH-funded institutions. Read the statement here.   U.S. Senate passes spending bill that increases NIH budget by $2 billion The Senate voted 93-7 on Sept. 18 to pass an $854 billion…

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Science policy weekly roundup: August 31, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: August 31, 2018

Senate committee holds hearing on nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier to head OSTP Science Policy Analyst André Porter discusses last week’s U.S. Senate committee hearing to nominate Kelvin Droegemeier to lead the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Several senators asked the nominee about how he would ensure that scientific evidence would be taken seriously by the administration. Droegemeier, a meteorologist, also side-stepped questions regarding whether humans were responsible for climate change. Read more here.   Elizabeth Warren raises concern about…

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Science policy weekly roundup: August 10, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: August 10, 2018

Members of Congress urge NIH to take action to stop sexual harassment in science U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., sent a letter Monday to the National Institutes of Health requesting a briefing about how the agency is addressing sexual harassment in science. The lawmakers’ letter asked NIH officials to provide information about its sexual harassment policy, relevant working groups or task forces, and the number of harassment settlements that occurred in NIH-supported facilities. Read the…

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Science policy weekly roundup: July 27, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: July 27, 2018

U.S. Congress set to fund government well before fiscal deadline In a move surprising veteran federal budget watchers, the U.S. Senate is on track to pass a bill to fund both the military and a large swath of domestic programs, including the National Institutes of Health. Senate leaders are prioritizing the bill, hoping to avert another government shutdown in October, ahead of this year’s November midterm elections. Read more here.   U.S. House committee holds hearing on implementation of 21st…

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