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Science policy weekly update: April 6, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly update: April 6, 2018

White House discusses how to reduce funding from passed budget President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans are looking to cut billions of dollars from the fiscal 2018 funding bill passed last month. Using a legislative tactic called a rescission resolution, the White House’s budget-reduction proposal would need the support of a majority of U.S. senators, which is unlikely to happen given that the Republicans hold the Senate majority by only one person. Trump also is seeking line-item veto power over…

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Science policy weekly roundup: March 30, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: March 30, 2018

How the NIH has fared under Trump in defiance of the administration’s proposed budget cuts, Congress has increased the budget of the National Institutes of Health by $5 billion during President Donald Trump’s tenure. The NIH leadership and its initiatives like the Cancer Moonshot have carried over from the Obama administration, providing a stable transition for scientists to continue their work. Read more here.   NIH considers more assertive enforcement of its confidentiality policies in proposal reviews The NIH is looking…

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Science policy weekly roundup: March 23, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: March 23, 2018

FY18 omnibus will give boost to federal science agencies The $1.3 trillion spending bill passed the U.S. House and Senate on Thursday to fund the government for FY18. The bill will give a $3 billion increase to the National Institutes of Health, a $330 million increase to the National Science Foundation, and a $868 million increase to the Department of Energy Office of Science. Read science policy analyst André Porter’s post for more information. Trump signs spending bill after threatening…

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Science Policy Weekly Roundup: March 16, 2018 ?>

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: March 16, 2018

Share the importance of your research in an op-ed Join the ASBMB in advocating for the importance of research funding from March 19 to April 11 by writing an op-ed for your local paper. Op-eds help your legislators understand the importance of research and how it affects their constituents. Watch our webinar on how to write an op-ed, and then sign up here to make your voice heard. Lawmakers disagree on details of budget as government shutdown looms, again Congressional…

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Science policy weekly update: March 9, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly update: March 9, 2018

Episode 6 of “Pipettes and Politics” is available Emily Holubowich, executive director of the Coalition for Health Funding, joins the sixth episode of the ASBMB’s science policy podcast, “Pipettes and Politics,” to discuss the ongoing negotiations for the fiscal year 2018 and 2019 budgets. ASBMB public affairs staff members also cover the recent U.S. House science panel hearing on sexual misconduct in science, the White House report on science and technology during President Donald Trump’s first year, and a new…

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Science Policy Weekly Update: March 2, 2018 ?>

Science Policy Weekly Update: March 2, 2018

Don’t miss our webinar on op-ed writing on Friday Writing an op-ed is one way to let policymakers and the community know how your research and policies that affect your research might impact them. Dr. Tricia Serio, dean of the College of Natural Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and member of the ASBMB Public Affairs Advisory Committee, will provide a how-to guide for writing op-eds with a lens on advocating for the scientific enterprise. Register here.   Scientists…

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Science policy weekly roundup: February 23, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: February 23, 2018

ASBMB Hill Day applications close next Monday Scientists have until next Monday, Feb. 26, to apply for the ASBMB Student/Postdoc Capitol Hill Day. Selected applicants will attend several meetings with congressional representatives in Washington, D.C in April. Apply here.   NRSA individual predoctoral fellowship program discontinued The National Institute of General Medical Sciences is discontinuing its Ruth L. Kirschenstein National Research Service Award individual predoctoral fellowship (Parent F31) Program. The decision comes as NIGMS is refocusing its funds to support…

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Science Policy Weekly Roundup: February 16, 2018 ?>

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: February 16, 2018

ASBMB responds to President Donald Trump’s FY19 budget The Trump administration’s FY19 budget originally called for deep cuts for the NIH and the NSF. However, in response to the congressional budget deal that will infuse billions of dollars to the federal budget, the Office of Management and Budget walked back the cuts and instead proposed flat funding levels for those agencies. The administration’s original intent to reduce the NIH and NSF budgets demonstrate that the research enterprise is not a…

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Science policy weekly roundup: February 9, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: February 9, 2018

The ASBMB issues a statement on the passage of budget deal After Congress passed a two-year budget deal that would raise caps on nondefense discretionary spending by $130 billion, ASBMB Public Affairs Director Benjamin Corb issued a statement praising the bill. Read more here.   Congress reaches bipartisan budget deal after brief government shutdown Congress passed its bipartisan budget deal early Friday morning, preventing a government shutdown from taking full effect. The two-year omnibus spending package authorizes a nearly $300…

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Science policy roundup – February 2, 2018 ?>

Science policy roundup – February 2, 2018

The ASBMB co-hosts Capitol Hill briefing how NSF fueled breakthrough genetic discoveries The ASBMB, with the American Chemical Society, hosted a briefing for congressional staffers on the National Science Foundation’s role in supporting the discovery of CRISPR, a breakthrough genetic pathway and gene editing tool. The panel featured Berkeley scientists Jennifer Doudna and David Schaffer, and NSF acting assistant director of biological sciences Joanne Tornow. The panelists stressed the importance of investing in fundamental scientific research that can lead to…

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