State-funded stem cell research matters

The National Institutes of Health has enforced three distinct federal funding policies for human embryonic stem-cell research through the administrations of Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama. In 2001, George W. Bush placed restrictions on the use of federal funds for human embryonic stem-cell research, leading some state governments to fund the research themselves. California established…

The end of the stem-cell legal battle

Yesterday, the Supreme Court rejected a request to hear a case regarding the legality of federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells. The case, Sherley v. Sebelius, was first filed in 2009 and has made its way through several appeals courts. The courts never ruled in favor of those looking to ban hESC…

ASBMB Releases Position Statement on Embryonic Stem Cell Research

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology this week called for passage of federal legislation to establish a uniform regulatory landscape for the derivation and use of human embryonic stem cells. Calling existing legislation “ambiguous” and citing and “the constant specter of judicial challenges” that researchers face, the society representing thousands of biomedical researchers…

Stem Cell Funding Ban Lifted

In a long-awaited decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals has ruled 2-1 in favor of allowing the National Institutes of Health to continue to fund human embryonic stem cell research.  The decision invalidates the preliminary injunction, issued back in August 2010 in the case of Sherley v. Sebelius, which barred the use of federal funds…

Stem Cell Rulings Continue

A series of recent court decisions have begun to clarify the legal situation surrounding the future of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, following the Aug. 23 ruling that barred the use of federal funds for research involving hESCs.