Browsed by
Category: Stem Cells

Science policy weekly roundup: June 14, 2019 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: June 14, 2019

NIH group suggests how to address sexual harassment A working group on sexual harassment in science presented recommendations to the National Institutes of Health Advisory Committee to the Director on Thursday to combat sexual harassment at institutions that receive NIH funding. The four recommendations include treating sexual harassment as seriously as research misconduct, requiring institutions tell the NIH about misconduct investigations, providing opportunities for reentry to scientists who have left academia because of harassment, and asking grantees about their misconduct…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: June 6, 2019 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: June 6, 2019

  Your voice can help broaden America’s STEM workforce The ASBMB’s Public Affairs Advisory Committee is working to advance legislation that will influence the makeup of the nation’s scientific workforce. The STEM Opportunities Act, also known as H.R. 2528, directs federal agencies and universities to mitigate barriers for women and underrepresented minorities seeking to participate in STEM training and careers. Tell your lawmakers to support the bill.   U.S. health agency limits use of human fetal tissue from elective abortions The U.S. Department of…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: December 14, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: December 14, 2018

Partial government shutdown likely as negotiations falter During a testy exchange with Democratic congressional leaders this week, President Donald Trump threatened a government shutdown if a spending bill to fund parts of the government did not include at least $5 billion for a U.S.–Mexico border wall. Lawmakers, many of whom have already left Washington, D.C., for winter recess, have until Dec. 21 to pass a funding bill to keep the government open.  Read more here.   U.S. Congress holds hearing on…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: November 30, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: November 30, 2018

Critics pounce on scientist’s claim of using CRISPR on human embryos A firestorm of criticism ensued after Chinese scientist He Jiankui’s claim that he used CRISPR to genetically alter the DNA of human embryos that were used to produce twin girls. Chinese authorities have suspended Jiankui’s research, while National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins called for a “binding international consensus” on regulating gene editing. Read more here.   Trump prioritizes border wall funding in latest budget negotiations President Donald…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: November 16, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: November 16, 2018

Science policy weekly roundup: November 16, 2018 Department of Education proposes additional protections for students accused of sexual assault U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos today announced new changes to Title IX laws, which prevent gender discrimination at schools that receive federal dollars. The changes include allowing schools to raise the amount of proof needed to substantiate a sexual assault allegation and giving the accused and accuser the right to cross-examine each other. “The rules do not go into effect until…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: Oct. 19, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: Oct. 19, 2018

Scientists navigate life after congressional run Dozens of scientists ran for congressional seats this year, but a majority failed to win their primary races. While many lost because of their inexperience and lack of connections to local political institutions, some are continuing to explore their new passion for public service as they settle back into the lab.  Read more here.    Scientists push to stop cardiac stem-cell study based on fabricated data Scientists are urging a national clinical trial network stop…

Read More Read More

State-funded stem cell research matters ?>

State-funded stem cell research matters

The National Institutes of Health has enforced three distinct federal funding policies for human embryonic stem-cell research through the administrations of Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama. In 2001, George W. Bush placed restrictions on the use of federal funds for human embryonic stem-cell research, leading some state governments to fund the research themselves. California established the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and other states followed with various funding mechanisms of their own.

The end of the stem-cell legal battle ?>

The end of the stem-cell legal battle

Yesterday, the Supreme Court rejected a request to hear a case regarding the legality of federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells. The case, Sherley v. Sebelius, was first filed in 2009 and has made its way through several appeals courts. The courts never ruled in favor of those looking to ban hESC research, although the plaintiffs were granted a brief preliminary injunction in 2010. With the Supreme Court’s rejection today, the plaintiffs have no further legal options…

Read More Read More

A legal victory for embryonic stem-cell researchers ?>

A legal victory for embryonic stem-cell researchers

On Friday morning, another chapter was closed in the longstanding dispute over the legality of federally funded human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research. A three-judge federal appeals court unanimously upheld the ruling of a lower court that allowed the NIH to continue to fund research on hESCs. The case, first filed in 2009, revolves around the language of the Dickey–Wicker amendment, which bars federal funding for research that destroys human embryos. The plaintiffs in the case, adult stem cell researchers…

Read More Read More

Federal Judge Overturns Ruling Banning NIH Funding of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research ?>

Federal Judge Overturns Ruling Banning NIH Funding of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Today, District of Columbia District Court Judge Royce Lamberth overturned his own ruling in the case of Sherley v. Sebelius that had banned use of funds from the National Institutes of Health for human embryonic stem cell research.  The ruling is the latest, though by no means final, turn in this saga that has seen scientific arguments devolve into interpretations of dictionary definitions. In 2009, the case against the NIH was first brought by researchers James Sherley and Theresa Deisher,…

Read More Read More