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Category: Stem Cells

State-funded stem cell research matters ?>

State-funded stem cell research matters

The National Institutes of Health has enforced three distinct federal funding policies for human embryonic stem-cell research through the administrations of Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama. In 2001, George W. Bush placed restrictions on the use of federal funds for human embryonic stem-cell research, leading some state governments to fund the research themselves. California established the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and other states followed with various funding mechanisms of their own.

The end of the stem-cell legal battle ?>

The end of the stem-cell legal battle

Yesterday, the Supreme Court rejected a request to hear a case regarding the legality of federal funding for research on human embryonic stem cells. The case, Sherley v. Sebelius, was first filed in 2009 and has made its way through several appeals courts. The courts never ruled in favor of those looking to ban hESC research, although the plaintiffs were granted a brief preliminary injunction in 2010. With the Supreme Court’s rejection today, the plaintiffs have no further legal options…

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A legal victory for embryonic stem-cell researchers ?>

A legal victory for embryonic stem-cell researchers

On Friday morning, another chapter was closed in the longstanding dispute over the legality of federally funded human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research. A three-judge federal appeals court unanimously upheld the ruling of a lower court that allowed the NIH to continue to fund research on hESCs. The case, first filed in 2009, revolves around the language of the Dickey–Wicker amendment, which bars federal funding for research that destroys human embryos. The plaintiffs in the case, adult stem cell researchers…

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Federal Judge Overturns Ruling Banning NIH Funding of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research ?>

Federal Judge Overturns Ruling Banning NIH Funding of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research

Today, District of Columbia District Court Judge Royce Lamberth overturned his own ruling in the case of Sherley v. Sebelius that had banned use of funds from the National Institutes of Health for human embryonic stem cell research.  The ruling is the latest, though by no means final, turn in this saga that has seen scientific arguments devolve into interpretations of dictionary definitions. In 2009, the case against the NIH was first brought by researchers James Sherley and Theresa Deisher,…

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ASBMB Releases Position Statement on Embryonic Stem Cell Research ?>

ASBMB Releases Position Statement on Embryonic Stem Cell Research

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology this week called for passage of federal legislation to establish a uniform regulatory landscape for the derivation and use of human embryonic stem cells. Calling existing legislation “ambiguous” and citing and “the constant specter of judicial challenges” that researchers face, the society representing thousands of biomedical researchers insisted that the promises of embryonic stem cell research are in peril and the development of much-needed therapies and cures is being delayed. The statement…

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Stem Cell Legislation Re-Introduced in Congress ?>

Stem Cell Legislation Re-Introduced in Congress

Late last week, Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., and Rep. Charlie Dent, R.-Penn., introduced the Stem Cell Research Advancement Act, the latest congressional attempt to update federal policy governing human embryonic stem cell research. The bill would, according to a press release from Rep. DeGette, “codify the NIH’s guidelines for carrying out all human stem cell research, embryonic and adult,” a position repeatedly advocated for by ASBMB. A key stipulation in the current bill was that “research would have to use…

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Embryonic Stem Cell Research Legislation in the News Again ?>

Embryonic Stem Cell Research Legislation in the News Again

A paper released today in Cell studies the growth of the field of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell research and how it has been affected by both political and judicial interventions. Researchers at Stanford analyzed papers published on both human iPS and embryonic stem (hES) cells to see if the advent of iPS cells “had modified the trajectory of stem cell research.”  Their conclusion was a resounding “no”; rather, they found that the majority of studies using iPS cells were…

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Stem Cell Funding Ban Lifted ?>

Stem Cell Funding Ban Lifted

In a long-awaited decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals has ruled 2-1 in favor of allowing the National Institutes of Health to continue to fund human embryonic stem cell research.  The decision invalidates the preliminary injunction, issued back in August 2010 in the case of Sherley v. Sebelius, which barred the use of federal funds for any “research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed.”  After the injunction was enacted, the Department of Justice appealed, and the Appeals…

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ASBMB Co-signs Letter Urging Passage of Stem Cell Legislation ?>

ASBMB Co-signs Letter Urging Passage of Stem Cell Legislation

On Friday, ASBMB joined with more than 100 other organizations in co-signing a letter sent to congressional leaders, urging them to pass pending legislation that would “authorize and continue Federal support for human embryonic stem cell research.”  The letter calls on Congress “to help ensure the potential of [stem cell] research is translated into treatments and cures” that will “alleviate human suffering and enhance the quality of human life.” Named the “Stem Cell Research Advancement Act,” the proposed legislation would…

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Stem Cell Rulings Continue ?>

Stem Cell Rulings Continue

A series of recent court decisions have begun to clarify the legal situation surrounding the future of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, following the Aug. 23 ruling that barred the use of federal funds for research involving hESCs.