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Category: STEM Education

The National Science Board moves to address issues with the nation’s ‘skilled technical workforce’ ?>

The National Science Board moves to address issues with the nation’s ‘skilled technical workforce’

  The National Science Board convened last week for its final meeting of 2017.  The board reviewed programs and activities within the Directorate for Engineering, the latest iteration of its Science and Engineering Indicators report, and approved a charge to investigate the National Science Foundation’s role in support of the nation’s skilled technical workforce. Highlights from the meeting are below. The strategy committee highlighted one of NSF’s 10 Big Ideas, gave an overview of the Engineering Directorate’s activities and provided…

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ASBMB provides feedback on latest NIGMS proposal to increase diversity ?>

ASBMB provides feedback on latest NIGMS proposal to increase diversity

  In August, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences requested feedback from the scientific community on the potential impacts of changing the funding vehicle for some of the institute’s undergraduate and predoctoral diversity programs.  The institute is seeking to support a broader swath of students by moving its undergrad diversity programs, which use the research education code (R25), to training grants (T32 or T34).  Training grants allow grantees to extend tuition support to undergraduate students, which is not possible…

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Science policy weekly news update: September 29, 2017 ?>

Science policy weekly news update: September 29, 2017

  What’s new in Blotter News Policy analyst André Porter discusses President Donald Trump’s memorandum directing $200 million a year to the Department of Education for STEM and computer science instruction. This memo stands in contrast with the administration’s earlier proposal to cut $9.2 billion from the Department of Education budget. President Trump’s first STEM education memo avoids increased federal funding by securing short-term private investments   Senate Republicans this week failed once again to gather 50 votes to approve…

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President Trump’s first STEM education memo avoids increased federal funding by securing short-term private investments ?>

President Trump’s first STEM education memo avoids increased federal funding by securing short-term private investments

  This week, President Donald Trump released a memorandum to increase access to high-quality science, technology, engineering and mathematics education.   The memo directs the secretary of education to prioritize $200 million per year to promote STEM and computer-science instruction at the state level through the agency’s existing grant programs. The memo’s focus on STEM and computer-science education comes at a shock to many who have viewed the administration as one that ignores the importance of STEM to the future of…

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Science policy weekly news update: Sept. 22, 2017 ?>

Science policy weekly news update: Sept. 22, 2017

What’s new in Blotter news? In response to President Donald J. Trump’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, the ASBMB released a statement urging congressional action to codify DACA into law. ASBMB statement on Trump’s decision to end DACA Science Policy Analyst André Porter reports on the National Institute of General Medical Sciences’ advisory council meeting this week. Porter presented a statement by the ASBMB inquiring about the Next Generation Researchers Initiative during the public comments…

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Senate appropriations bills provide a boost to DOE’s office of Science and a cut to NSF in 2018 ?>

Senate appropriations bills provide a boost to DOE’s office of Science and a cut to NSF in 2018

  The Senate Appropriations Committee has approved two draft funding bills for fiscal 2018 that conflict with appropriation bills proposed by the House earlier this month.  The House Appropriations Committee proposed flat funding for the National Science Foundation research programs and Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The Senate, however, is seeking to provide a slight cut and increase, respectively. Under the budgets put forth by the Senate Appropriations Committee, the NSF would receive $7.3 billion and the Department of…

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Science Policy Roundup: November 22, 2013 ?>

Science Policy Roundup: November 22, 2013

The world of science policy can be hard to keep up with, especially when a scientist is consumed at the bench. That’s where the Policy Blotter comes in! The Science Policy Roundup features the week’s science policy news. The America COMPETES Act is up for reauthorization. This bill was enacted in 2007 and reauthorized in 2010 to guide investments in research and development to promote innovation to keep the U.S. as a leader in the competitive world market. The U.S….

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Creationism creeping into high school textbooks? ?>

Creationism creeping into high school textbooks?

The teaching of evolution and creationism in the classroom has generated ongoing debate for years. The newest controversy comes from Texas where the State Board of Education is considering whether to approve high school science textbooks for use in the next school year through 2022. The approval of these textbooks could have implications across the U.S. since Texas is one of the few states that has publishers that distribute textbooks nationwide. Thus, these textbooks could land in classrooms in numerous…

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Summer legislation and the scientific community ?>

Summer legislation and the scientific community

Today, Congress returns from their Memorial Day holiday. Much of the political news in the coming months will focus on scandals rather than legislation. However, Congress will be in session for the next two months with a brief break for Independence Day, and they are sure to do some legislating, right? Here is a preview of some of the policy issues we will be following during the D.C. summer. Immigration reform On May 21, the Senate Judiciary committee passed the…

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Associate director for science leaves the White House OSTP ?>

Associate director for science leaves the White House OSTP

On June 1 the Office of Science and Technology Policy confirmed that Nobel Prize-winning physicist Carl Wieman would be stepping down as the associate director for science. Weiner has been a leading science education advocate since joining the OSTP in 2010. After winning the Nobel Prize in 2001 for the creation of the first Bose-Einstein condensate, Wieman switched gears to instead study science education. In 2007, he established the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia,…

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