Browsed by
Category: STEM Education

Science Policy Roundup: November 22, 2013 ?>

Science Policy Roundup: November 22, 2013

The world of science policy can be hard to keep up with, especially when a scientist is consumed at the bench. That’s where the Policy Blotter comes in! The Science Policy Roundup features the week’s science policy news. The America COMPETES Act is up for reauthorization. This bill was enacted in 2007 and reauthorized in 2010 to guide investments in research and development to promote innovation to keep the U.S. as a leader in the competitive world market. The U.S….

Read More Read More

Creationism creeping into high school textbooks? ?>

Creationism creeping into high school textbooks?

The teaching of evolution and creationism in the classroom has generated ongoing debate for years. The newest controversy comes from Texas where the State Board of Education is considering whether to approve high school science textbooks for use in the next school year through 2022. The approval of these textbooks could have implications across the U.S. since Texas is one of the few states that has publishers that distribute textbooks nationwide. Thus, these textbooks could land in classrooms in numerous…

Read More Read More

Summer legislation and the scientific community ?>

Summer legislation and the scientific community

Today, Congress returns from their Memorial Day holiday. Much of the political news in the coming months will focus on scandals rather than legislation. However, Congress will be in session for the next two months with a brief break for Independence Day, and they are sure to do some legislating, right? Here is a preview of some of the policy issues we will be following during the D.C. summer. Immigration reform On May 21, the Senate Judiciary committee passed the…

Read More Read More

Associate director for science leaves the White House OSTP ?>

Associate director for science leaves the White House OSTP

On June 1 the Office of Science and Technology Policy confirmed that Nobel Prize-winning physicist Carl Wieman would be stepping down as the associate director for science. Weiner has been a leading science education advocate since joining the OSTP in 2010. After winning the Nobel Prize in 2001 for the creation of the first Bose-Einstein condensate, Wieman switched gears to instead study science education. In 2007, he established the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia,…

Read More Read More

President Obama highlights the importance of basic research in the State of the Union address ?>

President Obama highlights the importance of basic research in the State of the Union address

In his 2012 State of the Union address, President Obama called economic fairness “the defining issue of our time.” In addition to focusing on tax reform, foreign policy and domestic job creation, the president also drew attention to several topics of interest to the biomedical research community, particularly, the importance of federal support for basic research. “Innovation also demands basic research. Today, the discoveries taking place in our federally financed labs and universities could lead to new treatments that kill…

Read More Read More

New National Academies Report Details Ways to Improve STEM Education ?>

New National Academies Report Details Ways to Improve STEM Education

Last week, the National Academies’ National Research Council released a report detailing ways for improving K-12 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. Titled “Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics,” the report aimed to “provide information that leaders at the school district, state, and national level can use to make strategic decisions about improving STEM education” by “outlining criteria for identifying effective STEM schools and programs and identifying which of those criteria could…

Read More Read More

AAAS Hosts Annual Science and Technology Policy Forum ?>

AAAS Hosts Annual Science and Technology Policy Forum

The American Association for the Advancement of Sciences held its 36th annual Forum on Science and Technology Policy on May 5 and 6.  Over 400 participants took part in a series of lectures, panel discussions, and informal briefings during the conference, held at the Ronald Reagan building in downtown Washington D.C. Headlining the list of notable speakers was John Holdren, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.  In his speech, Holdren emphasized that science and technology…

Read More Read More

Senate Passes America COMPETES ?>

Senate Passes America COMPETES

After months of trying, the U.S. Senate finally passed a reauthorization of the America COMPETES act last week, more than two months after the initial version of it, passed in 2007, expired.  The 2010 version focuses on three main areas: (1) increasing science and research investments, (2) strengthening science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and (3) developing an innovation infrastructure.  In particular, the bill provides a three-year reauthorization of the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy Office of Science…

Read More Read More

Science Featured In National Events ?>

Science Featured In National Events

Science is in the national spotlight as events and award ceremonies around the country take place.  On Oct. 10, the USA Science and Engineering Festival kicked off.  Dedicated to “re-invigorate the interest of our nation’s youth in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM),”  the two-week festival features exhibits, movies and performances aimed at “producing and presenting the most compelling, exciting, educational and entertaining science gatherings in the United States.” Meanwhile, several ASBMB members received national recognition for their accomplishments.  The…

Read More Read More