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Guest Blog: Suzanne Pfeffer talks about importance of voting ?>

Guest Blog: Suzanne Pfeffer talks about importance of voting

Below is a guest post by Suzanne Pfeffer, of Stanford University.  Dr. Pfeffer is a past-president of ASBMB. This election seems to be the most important election of my entire adult life.  There were other elections in the past where I didn’t vote for, or agree with the views of the winner, but we made it through, nonetheless.  This is the first time where the conversation is such that if I quoted the speaker at my workplace, I could lose…

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Science policy news weekly roundup: June 10, 2016 ?>

Science policy news weekly roundup: June 10, 2016

If you find a particularly interesting article, please send it to aporter@asbmb.org for inclusion in next week’s roundup. The U.S. Senate Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies appropriations subcommittee approved a funding bill that would increase funding for the National Institute of Health by $2 billion, putting the agency’s budget at $34 billion. Senate moves to increase NIH budget (PolicyBlotter) NIH funding: It’s personal (The Atlantic) Senate passes $34B NIH budget to advance precision medicine (Health IT Analytic) The…

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Highlights from committee U.S. Senate hearing: Leveraging the U.S. science and technology enterprise ?>

Highlights from committee U.S. Senate hearing: Leveraging the U.S. science and technology enterprise

The U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation held a hearing last week to discuss the future of U.S. research and development investments.  The hearing centered on how funded research can translate into innovations in industry and in turn, the economy. The committee brought in expert witnesses from academia, the private sector and a government advisory board to testify and provide insight on possible strategies that the committee can utilize in drafting new legislation to leverage U.S. investments in the…

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Science policy news: weekly roundup: January 15, 2016 ?>

Science policy news: weekly roundup: January 15, 2016

The roundup is formatted with the title of the story, followed by the news source in parentheses and a brief summary. If you find a particularly interesting article, please send it to smartin@asbmb.org for inclusion in next week’s roundup.  U.S. President Barack Obama delivered the State of the Union address Tuesday evening. Obama charged Vice President Joe Biden with leading an initiative to cure cancer. President Obama Taps Biden To Eradicate Cancer In State Of The Union Speech (Forbes) Predictable…

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BREAKING: Congress and White House reach two-year budget agreement with sequester relief ?>

BREAKING: Congress and White House reach two-year budget agreement with sequester relief

Right around midnight, congressional leaders and the White House reached a budget deal to #RaiseTheCaps and extend the debt ceiling. A copy of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 is available here. The New York Times has a summary here. It appears: The BBA would increase discretionary spending by $80 billion over two years It would spread relief equally between defense and nondefense discretionary programs It would be spread over two years (fiscal 2016 and 2017), providing $80 billion in relief–$50 billion…

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Funding…for now ?>

Funding…for now

Oct. 1 marks the beginning of the federal fiscal year, which means that Congress must come up with a plan to fund the government for the coming fiscal year or the government will shut down. In the nick of time, Congress and President Obama agreed to a temporary continuing resolution that will fund the government through Dec. 11. A continuing resolution is a stop-gap funding measure that essentially states that Congress could not come up with a plan to fund…

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House Passes 21st Century Cures ?>

House Passes 21st Century Cures

ASBMB Statement on Passage of HR6 Today, the 21st Century Cures Act was passed on the floor of the House of Representatives by a vote of 344-77.  Cures has drawn bipartisan support with the goal of increasing funding for the National Institutes of Health and streamlining the pathway for new drugs to reach patients.