Science policy weekly roundup: Oct. 19, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: Oct. 19, 2018

Scientists navigate life after congressional run Dozens of scientists ran for congressional seats this year, but a majority failed to win their primary races. While many lost because of their inexperience and lack of connections to local political institutions, some are continuing to explore their new passion for public service as they settle back into the lab.  Read more here.    Scientists push to stop cardiac stem-cell study based on fabricated data Scientists are urging a national clinical trial network stop…

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Science policy weekly roundup: October 12, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: October 12, 2018

Proposed bill to study sexual harassment in science Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-Texas, introduced a bill Oct. 5 to study factors that contribute to sexual harassment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields, and how harassment affects the scientific community. The proposed bill would give the National Science Foundation funding to support studies that develop and assess policies and interventions, and would create an interagency working group to coordinate these efforts. Read more here.   Columbia University postdocs vote to…

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Science policy weekly roundup: September 28, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: September 28, 2018

Where we’ve been: Attending the NSF BIO advisory meeting Science Policy Analyst André Porter provides an update from last week’s National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Biological Sciences Advisory Committee meeting. NSF officials discussed several issues affecting the directorate, including the elimination of submission deadlines, efforts to support mid-career researchers, and recently released sexual harassment policies.  Read more here.   U.S. House passes funding bill to give NIH $2 billion boost The U.S. House voted Wednesday to pass a spending package…

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Where we’ve been: attending the September Biological Sciences Directorate advisory committee meeting ?>

Where we’ve been: attending the September Biological Sciences Directorate advisory committee meeting

  The National Science Foundation’s Biological Sciences directorate held its biannual advisory committee meeting this month.  Agency officials provided an update on the directorate’s elimination of submission deadlines, new efforts to support mid-career researchers, agency wide initiatives and plans for future investments. Highlights from the meeting are below. Update on elimination of deadlines for core programs The directorate has eliminated application deadlines for its core grants.  While the directorate has developed scenarios for how it will handle peer review, long-term…

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Science policy weekly roundup: September 21, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: September 21, 2018

The ASBMB PAAC responds to NIH statement addressing sexual harassment in science The ASBMB PAAC released a statement in response to the NIH’s latest statement regarding sexual harassment in science. The PAAC urged the NIH to define how the agency will respond to violations of sexual harassment policies at NIH-funded institutions. Read the statement here.   U.S. Senate passes spending bill that increases NIH budget by $2 billion The Senate voted 93-7 on Sept. 18 to pass an $854 billion…

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National Science Foundation releases new sexual harassment policy ?>

National Science Foundation releases new sexual harassment policy

  The National Science Foundation released a new policy on Sept. 21 to address sexual harassment by personnel working on NSF-funded projects. The policy requires grantee institutions to report to the NSF within 10 business days any findings related to sexual harassment, other forms of harassment or sexual assault by principal investigators and co-PIs on NSF-funded projects. Upon notification, the NSF will evaluate the safety of other personnel and any impact to NSF-funded activities. The NSF may then substitute or…

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The ASBMB PAAC responds to NIH efforts to address sexual harassment in science ?>

The ASBMB PAAC responds to NIH efforts to address sexual harassment in science

The following is a statement from Benjamin Corb, public affairs director for the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: “National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins released a statement yesterday making it clear that the agency does not tolerate sexual harassment. While the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s Public Affairs Advisory Committee appreciates the sentiments expressed in the statement, NIH policy changes are needed to curb sexual harassment at grantee institutions. Our primary concern is that…

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Science policy weekly roundup: Sept. 7, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: Sept. 7, 2018

FDA says Trump administration’s limits on foreign hires hinders recruiting power According to Melanie Keller, acting associate commissioner for scientific and clinical recruitment at the Food and Drug Administration, limits on foreign hires placed by the Trump administration have hampered the regulatory agency’s ability to attract top scientists. The policy, implemented in August 2017, requires the FDA to hire candidates who have lived in the U.S. for three of the past five years. Read more here.   Trump walks back…

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Science policy weekly roundup: August 31, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: August 31, 2018

Senate committee holds hearing on nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier to head OSTP Science Policy Analyst André Porter discusses last week’s U.S. Senate committee hearing to nominate Kelvin Droegemeier to lead the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Several senators asked the nominee about how he would ensure that scientific evidence would be taken seriously by the administration. Droegemeier, a meteorologist, also side-stepped questions regarding whether humans were responsible for climate change. Read more here.   Elizabeth Warren raises concern about…

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Sen. Warren, D-Mass., raises concern about private funding to the NIH ?>

Sen. Warren, D-Mass., raises concern about private funding to the NIH

When National Institutes of Health Director Francis S. Collins testified before a U.S. Senate committee last week about prioritizing cures, most senators asked him about how research is progressing on specific diseases. U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, however, raised questions about the role of the Foundation for the NIH in soliciting private dollars to fund NIH studies. Established by Congress in 1990, the FNIH is a nonprofit that solicits donations from companies and other organizations to help…

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