Science policy news: weekly roundup: December 18, 2015

The roundup is formatted with the title of the story, followed by the news source in parentheses and a brief summary. If you find a particularly interesting article, please send it to smartin@asbmb.org for inclusion in next week’s roundup.

The U.S. House of Representatives and Senate passed the fiscal 2016 omnibus spending bill this morning. The National Institutes of Health is set to receive a $2 billion budget increase.

Omnibus Bill Contains Boost for Several Science Agencies (AAAS)

Budget Bill Limits New Food Advice, Edited Humans, GM Salmon (NBC News)

NIH Set for Big Budget Bump (The Scientist)

The Budget Deal Is Going to Fund Lots of Great Science. Yes! (Slate)

Updated: Budget agreement boosts U.S. science (Science Insider)

 

ASBMB Public Affairs Advisory Committee member Tricia Serio cautions policymakers that the NIH needs sustainable funding to avoid a scientific discovery shutdown.

We’re heading for scientific discovery shutdown (The Hill)

 

Diversity lags in clinical research populations and in academic medicine leadership.

Diversity in Clinical and Biomedical Research: A Promise Yet to Be Fulfilled (PLOS Medicine)

Researchers call for the NIH to improve diversity in clinical research in the US (EurekAlert!)

Science is embarrassingly white. That’s a huge problem. (Fusion)

“Quirky” Penn Study Shows Women Less Likely to Hold Academic Medical Leadership Roles Than Men with Mustaches (Newswise)

 

The NIH released a five-year strategic plan that outlines the priorities of the agency.

NIH releases first agency-wide strategic plan in 2 decades (Science Insider)

NIH Releases Strategic Five-Year Plan (PharmTech)

NIH drops special 10% set-aside for AIDS research (Science Insider)

 

The gene-editing technology CRISPR-Cas9 sparked debate this year over the bioethical implications of editing the human germline.

Year in Review: CRISPR Blossoms (The Scientist)

A Pause to Weigh Risks of Gene Editing (The New York Times)

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