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Science Policy Roundup: November 15, 2013 ?>

Science Policy Roundup: November 15, 2013

The world of science policy can be hard to keep up with, especially when a scientist is consumed at the bench. That’s where the Policy Blotter comes in! The Science Policy Roundup features the week’s science policy news. Nondefense Discretionary United is “a coalition of leaders joining forces in an effort to save public services (known in Congress as nondefense discretionary programs) from devastating budget cuts.” NDD United released a report detailing the stories of individuals across the country suffering…

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Science Policy Roundup: November 8, 2013 ?>

Science Policy Roundup: November 8, 2013

The world of science policy can be hard to keep up with, especially when a scientist is consumed at the bench. That’s where the Policy Blotter comes in! Starting now, the Science Policy Roundup will feature the week’s science policy news. The National Institutes of Health was highlighted in speeches by U.S. Senators Bob Casey, D-Penn., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. Both called for an increase in the NIH budget. “Sen. Casey: Congress cannot allow budget fight to affect medical research”…

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Summer legislation and the scientific community ?>

Summer legislation and the scientific community

Today, Congress returns from their Memorial Day holiday. Much of the political news in the coming months will focus on scandals rather than legislation. However, Congress will be in session for the next two months with a brief break for Independence Day, and they are sure to do some legislating, right? Here is a preview of some of the policy issues we will be following during the D.C. summer. Immigration reform On May 21, the Senate Judiciary committee passed the…

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ASBMB meets with U.S. House staff to discuss peer review legislation ?>

ASBMB meets with U.S. House staff to discuss peer review legislation

On Tuesday, ASBMB Public Affairs Director Ben Corb attended a meeting with the staff members of the U.S. House Science, Space and Technology committee that drafted the High Quality Research Act. The SST staff wanted to have a discussion with the scientific community to clear up misconceptions about the bill. The reality is that very little was clarified. Over 70 representatives of research organizations attended the meeting to ask questions of SST staff. SST staff indicated this version of the…

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The National Science Foundation responds to request for peer review information ?>

The National Science Foundation responds to request for peer review information

Peer review at the National Science Foundation has been the focus of recent inquiries from the U.S. House Science, Space and Technology committee. Chairman Lamar Smith, R-Texas, had requested the notes of the peer reviewers and program officers pertaining to five grants awarded by the NSF. In a letter to NSF Acting Director Cora Marrett, Smith said he had “concerns regarding some grants approved by the Foundation and how closely they adhere to NSF’s ‘intellectual merit’ guideline.” President Obama, White…

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An update on peer review and the National Science Foundation ?>

An update on peer review and the National Science Foundation

Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, chair of the House Science, Space and Technology committee has spurred two distinct, yet related, discussions regarding peer review and the National Science Foundation. First, in an April 25 letter to NSF Acting Director Cora Marrett, Smith wrote, “I have concerns regarding some grants approved by the Foundation and how closely they adhere to NSF’s ‘intellectual merit’ guideline.” Smith went on to request the notes from the peer reviewers and NSF program officers regarding five grants…

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Two weeks of intense attacks on the National Science Foundation and the peer-review process ?>

Two weeks of intense attacks on the National Science Foundation and the peer-review process

The past two weeks were tumultuous for the National Science Foundation thanks to two hearings in the U.S. House of Representatives, a pair of letters passed between high-ranking members of Congress, and a controversial new bill. Discussions between Congress and NSF centered on the peer-review process and a question, most commonly coming from Republican representatives and senators, of whether the federal government should fund social science research in difficult economic times. House hearings On April 17, the full House Committee…

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Science and the 2012 election ?>

Science and the 2012 election

While science policy did not figure prominently in the 2012 election cycle, the outcomes of several races in the U.S. House and Senate could have significant effects on future policies regarding the conduct of science. One of the biggest losses for biomedical research came in California. Republican Brian Bilbray, a strong proponent of biomedical research from the San Diego area, appears to be headed for defeat in the state’s 52nd district. Bilbray is the co-chair of the House Biomedical Research…

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ASBMB member James Siedow testifies before the U.S. House Science, Space and Technology committee ?>

ASBMB member James Siedow testifies before the U.S. House Science, Space and Technology committee

On June 27, the U.S. House of Representatives, research and science education subcommittee held a hearing on the future of research universities in the U.S. ASBMB member James Siedow, vice provost for research at Duke University, testified before the subcommittee along with four other witnesses representing research universities. The hearing took place just a few days after the release of the National Academy of Sciences’ report Research Universities and the Future of America. The congressionally requested report outlines 10 recommendations…

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Federal reports point to R&D as the key to American innovation ?>

Federal reports point to R&D as the key to American innovation

We’re only three weeks into the new year, and a barrage of federal reports that focus on the status of American competitiveness and innovation capacity already have been released. Not surprisingly, the connection between research and education in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields and a strong national economy was highlighted in each report. On Jan. 6, the Department of Commerce delivered The Competitive and Innovative Capacity of the U.S. report to Congress. The report outlines the three elements…

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