Browsed by
Category: Science Funding

What we’re watching for ?>

What we’re watching for

The 115th Congress has begun its legislative work, and we’re five days into the presidency of Donald Trump.  To say that Washington, D.C., is active in these early days of 2017 is an understatement. The focus of political leaders is not – shockingly – how to handle biomedical research and science policy over the next couple of years.  The spotlight is focused on the future of the Affordable Care Act, who is going to pay for a southern border war,…

Read More Read More

President-elect Trump’s Cabinet picks ?>

President-elect Trump’s Cabinet picks

  Presidential appointees help prioritize U.S. research goals by advising the sitting president on current and future scientific issues.  In fiscal 2016, the federal government provided a projected $137.6 billion in support for research and development , $33 billion of which went to  basic research.  To date, president-elect Trump has identified 17 of 21 key cabinet members. These Cabinet members will be responsible for the bulk of federal dollars awarded to scientists across the U.S.   Department of Health and…

Read More Read More

ASBMB Congressional Briefing: A Continuing Resolution’s Impact on Research ?>

ASBMB Congressional Briefing: A Continuing Resolution’s Impact on Research

  The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology held a congressional briefing Tuesday about the effects that a long-term continuing resolution would have on the biomedical research community. Speakers included Harry Stein, director of fiscal policy at the Center for American Progress; Thomas Baldwin, president-elect of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology and professor at the University of California, Riverside; and James Brown, executive director of the STEM Education Coalition. Here are the highlights: Stein described a…

Read More Read More

Continuing resolution: Preventing a government shutdown ?>

Continuing resolution: Preventing a government shutdown

  Congress returned to work last week after its summer recess. In the next month, Congress’ main priority will be to approve funding for the federal government in fiscal 2017. Congress’ inability to pass the 12 separate annual appropriation spending bills has resulted in it needing to approve a temporary spending bill, or continuing resolution, before the Sept. 30 deadline to prevent a government shutdown. A continuing resolution is a short-term way for Congress to continue funding federal agencies without…

Read More Read More

Appropriations update: 2017 sequestration report ?>

Appropriations update: 2017 sequestration report

  Congress reconvened Tuesday and will remain in session for four weeks. We expect that lawmakers will pass a continuing resolution to fund the government at least into December. If, by the off chance, lawmakers do not pass a continuing resolution and instead proceed to resolve their differences to pass an actual appropriations bill, we recommend that they take a close look at the fiscal 2017 OMB Sequestration Update Report. Last month, the Office of Management and Budget released a…

Read More Read More

Zika funding: What’s the hold up? ?>

Zika funding: What’s the hold up?

  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been 14 documented locally acquired and 2,245 travel-associated Zika cases in the continental United States. In U.S. territories, there have been more than 8,000 cases. While most of the locally acquired cases in the United States have occurred in southeast Florida, recent data suggest the virus is spreading along the Gulf Coast to states including Louisiana and Texas. Despite the growing number of cases, and the spread of…

Read More Read More

Appropriations Update – House making progress ?>

Appropriations Update – House making progress

Last month, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved the fiscal 2017 appropriations bill for Labor, Health and Human Services and Related Agencies, the spending bill that provides annual funding for the National Institutes of Health.  Don’t remember the details from that bill?  You can click here for our coverage, but the bottom line is the Senate approved a $2 billion increase to the NIH for the upcoming fiscal year. NEXT STEPS:  The bill awaits debate and a vote by the full…

Read More Read More

House appropriators hear from NIH director on FY17 budget request ?>

House appropriators hear from NIH director on FY17 budget request

It’s appropriations season on Capitol Hill, and committees are hearing testimony from agency heads justifying their fiscal year 2017 budget requests.  Later this week, we’ll provide a review of the National Science Foundation hearing, but today let’s look at the National Institutes of Health hearing highlights. What we learned U.S. House appropriators really like the NIH … and want to give it more money. Labor Health and Human Services Appropriations Committee Chairman Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla) opened the hearing expressing…

Read More Read More

State-funded stem cell research matters ?>

State-funded stem cell research matters

The National Institutes of Health has enforced three distinct federal funding policies for human embryonic stem-cell research through the administrations of Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama. In 2001, George W. Bush placed restrictions on the use of federal funds for human embryonic stem-cell research, leading some state governments to fund the research themselves. California established the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and other states followed with various funding mechanisms of their own.

Legislative Update – Appropriations and the Senate innovation agenda ?>

Legislative Update – Appropriations and the Senate innovation agenda

As discussed last week, the appropriations process continues to progress behind closed doors. However, some details are emerging. All appropriations subcommittees have received their 302(b) allocations, and those allocations have been described to me by congressional staff as “fair.” The allocation for the Labor, Health and Human Services appropriations subcommittee, which funds the National Institutes of Health, is said to be “generous.” The original allocation for L-HHS had been below the fiscal year 2015 level, but it seems the Bipartisan…

Read More Read More