Browsed by
Category: Office of Management and Budget

Science policy weekly roundup: March 15, 2019 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: March 15, 2019

White House 2020 budget proposes deep cuts to science President Donald Trump released his budget proposal for fiscal year 2020 on Monday. The proposal cuts the budgets of the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and Department of Energy Office of Science by at least 12 percent. However, the U.S. Congress has rejected Trump’s last two budget proposals and awarded billions to federal science agencies. Read more here. NCI Director Ned Sharpless named acting FDA commissioner National Cancer Institute…

Read More Read More

White House releases 2020 budget request ?>

White House releases 2020 budget request

This week, President Donald Trump released his fiscal year 2020 budget request. The proposal, titled “A Budget for a Better America: Promises Kept. Taxpayers First” outlines $4.75 trillion to fund the federal government for FY 2020 which begins on Oct. 1. The proposed budget is in-line with the 2011 Budget Control Act.  This law places requirements on Congress to address the nation’s debt limit and avoid default through budget sequestration. The request calls for over $2.7 trillion in spending cuts…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly roundup: August 10, 2018 ?>

Science policy weekly roundup: August 10, 2018

Members of Congress urge NIH to take action to stop sexual harassment in science U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., sent a letter Monday to the National Institutes of Health requesting a briefing about how the agency is addressing sexual harassment in science. The lawmakers’ letter asked NIH officials to provide information about its sexual harassment policy, relevant working groups or task forces, and the number of harassment settlements that occurred in NIH-supported facilities. Read the…

Read More Read More

Episode 6 of “Pipettes and Politics” is available ?>

Episode 6 of “Pipettes and Politics” is available

The sixth episode of the ASBMB science policy podcast “Pipettes and Politics” is now available. ASBMB public affairs staff members discuss the U.S. House science committee’s hearing on sexual harassment and misconduct in science, the National Science Foundation’s efforts to combat sexual misconduct, and the White House’s report on science and technology in the first year of the Trump administration. Analysis and rebuttal by Matt Hourihan of AAAS of several claims in the White House report can be found here. …

Read More Read More

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: January 12, 2018   ?>

Science Policy Weekly Roundup: January 12, 2018  

  Government shutdown threat grows as Democrats and conservatives dig in The continuing resolution funding the federal government expires on Jan. 19, and negotiations for a bipartisan budget deal remain difficult. Democrats are tying budget negotiations to an immigration deal that would provide protections to recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program. Passing another continuing resolution to temporarily fund the government for another month also may prove challenging. These temporary funding strategies prevent federal agencies like…

Read More Read More

Science policy weekly news update: October 27, 2017 ?>

Science policy weekly news update: October 27, 2017

  Standardizing postdoc titles Eight scientists and science policy experts with ties to the ASBMB published an opinion article in the journal eLife this week making the case that what we call postdoctoral researchers really does matter. Read the ASBMB announcement and the eLife article.   What is next for the March for Science? It has been six months since the March for Science, a global event uniting hundreds of thousands of scientists from around the world to highlight the…

Read More Read More

Science Policy news weekly update: August 14, 2017 ?>

Science Policy news weekly update: August 14, 2017

  What’s new in Blotter news? The ASBMB has been providing feedback to the National Institutes of Health regarding its Next Generation Researchers Initiative. The ASBMB provides feedback regarding the NIH’s Next Generation Researchers Initiative   Science Policy Analyst Andre Porter discusses the White House memo with its priorities for research and development to guide federal funding. President Trump releases his research and development priorities for FY19   A recent National Academies of Science report stated that the American biomedical…

Read More Read More

President Trump releases his research and development priorities for FY19 ?>

President Trump releases his research and development priorities for FY19

  This week, President Donald Trump released his first memorandum of research and development priorities that will be used by federal funding agencies to draft budget requests for the next fiscal year.  Trump’s priorities include R&D that increases American military superiority, security, prosperity, energy dominance and health. Trump encouraged agencies to reallocate existing commitments to accommodate his priorities without spending more money. This memo suggests that while the federal government should invest in early stage basic and applied research, the…

Read More Read More

ASBMB rejects President Trump’s FY18 budget ?>

ASBMB rejects President Trump’s FY18 budget

President Donald Trump released his fiscal year 18 budget proposal on Tuesday.  Included in that proposal is a $7.4 billion cut in funding for the National Institutes of Health. Benjamin Corb, director of public affairs for the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has provided the following statement in response to the proposal: President Donald Trump’s fiscal year 2018 budget, if enacted, would significantly damage the nation’s role as the global leader of research and innovation, and would roll…

Read More Read More

Trump administration proposes more cuts to FY17 research-funding spending ?>

Trump administration proposes more cuts to FY17 research-funding spending

  Earlier this week, the Trump administration released a proposal to reduce fiscal 2017 spending, and, as we reported on Tuesday, science funding agencies will not escape the belt-tightening. Since then, we’ve gotten our hands on more details, including what the administration has in mind for the National Science Foundation. But, before we get into that, let’s back up. At the end of 2016, Congress passed a short-term continuing resolution to fund the government until April 28.  Approved by the…

Read More Read More